Established in 1934 and lying in Eastern Rwanda hugging the border with Tanzania, the 1,122 km Akagera National Park is the largest and only Savannah Park in Rwanda characterized by woodland, swamps, low mountains, and savannah. The varied terrain shelters wildlife including zebras, giraffes, elephants, lions, and hundreds of bird species including the rarely sighted shoebill stork. In the Southern part of the park is the vast Lake Ihema, home to hippos and crocodiles.

Visitors can also encounter buffalos, elephants, antelopes, zebras, giraffes, baboons, monkeys, an incredible 490 bird species plus much more. The park is one of the best places for birding in Rwanda. It has a great concentration of water birds that thrive on the park’s vast marshes and wetlands.

A boat trip on Lake Ihema is also a highlight of any visit to Akagera, with its large pods of hippos, Nile crocodiles, and abundant waterbirds on the island in the middle of the lake.

 At the moment all the big five (Leopards, Elephants, Rhinos, Lions, and Buffaloes) are once again roaming the park freely. Apart from the big five, tourists can also spot zebras, impalas, oribis, bushbucks, elands, hippopotamus, and crocodiles.

Akagera is almost unrecognizable today compared to just 20 years ago when it was on the verge of being lost forever. While peace was finally restored in the 1990s after the 1994 Genocide, Akagera’s demise was just beginning. Refugees returning to Rwanda after the genocide were still battling for their own survival and turned to the forests for timber, wildlife for protein, and the wild savannas for their livestock. Lions were hunted to local extinction, rhinos disappeared, and the park’s wildlife was displaced by tens of thousands of long-horned cattle. Biodiversity was practically lost, and with it so were employment and tourism. The park’s value was virtually diminished, which makes its story of revival even more remarkable.

In 2010, African Parks assumed management of Akagera in partnership with the Rwanda Development Board (RDB), shifting the park's trajectory from one of oblivion to prosperity and hope. After years of preparation, through effective law enforcement and management, 2017 saw the historic return of 18 Eastern black rhinoceros after a 10-year absence, thanks to the support from the Howard G. Buffett Foundation. An additional five captive-bred black rhinos were translocated from Europe in June 2019, with the support of the European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA), to augment the genetic diversity. Two new male lions were also translocated to Akagera in 2017 to enhance the genetic diversity of the growing pride, which has now tripled since their initial reintroduction in 2015. With poaching essentially halted, the park’s key wildlife populations have continued to rise. The park is generating more than US$2.5M in annual revenue, making it 90% self-financing driven by the tens of thousands of people, half of whom are nationals, coming to see its rebirth.

 At the moment all the big five (Leopards, Elephants, Rhinos, Lions, and Buffaloes) are once again roaming the park freely. Apart from the big five, tourists can also spot zebras, impalas, oribis, bushbucks, elands, hippopotamus, and crocodiles.

Ruzizi Tented Lodge (Classic)

Magashi Akagera (Luxury)

Akagera Game Lodge (Classic)